Creativextraordinaire.

A friend of mine manages a gallery associated with the University of Texas.  We met for coffee one day to talk about an upcoming exhibition related to the run of The Lion King on campus.  At first, there were some specifics regarding the content of the artwork I was asked to produce for this exhibition, but those quickly fell to the wayside and was instead replaced with: “So long as it’s related to The Lion King in some way.” I was comforted by the looseness of these requirements, but also a bit disappointed with myself that, despite being given almost complete freedom,  I stuck to the script.
Alas, not entirely.   Although this triptych is definitely Lion King-y (reference: crown),  I definitely fell in love with painting much more deeply for having involved myself in this exhibition.  The photos don’t do the paint due justice.  The crown of the lion and the bells of the hyena’s jester hat are a rich metallic acrylic and catch the light oh-so-nicely.   There are metallic highlights in the hair of both predators and the eyes of the gazelle/antelope hybrid.  Creating the texture of the hair was maddening, challenging, and altogether worthwhile.  It’s not completely obvious in passing or at first glnce, but the gazelle has an open wound from which the vines are sprouting.   There are also a variety of style clashes happening:  The gazelle is painted in a slightly different style than the lion and hyena to emphasize that it is the prey animal.  The pseudo art nouveau quality of the paintings also seems strangely foreign given the African sitters’ origins. 
All in all I do say it was jolly good fun and I can’t wait to have another reason to paint. A friend of mine manages a gallery associated with the University of Texas.  We met for coffee one day to talk about an upcoming exhibition related to the run of The Lion King on campus.  At first, there were some specifics regarding the content of the artwork I was asked to produce for this exhibition, but those quickly fell to the wayside and was instead replaced with: “So long as it’s related to The Lion King in some way.” I was comforted by the looseness of these requirements, but also a bit disappointed with myself that, despite being given almost complete freedom,  I stuck to the script.
Alas, not entirely.   Although this triptych is definitely Lion King-y (reference: crown),  I definitely fell in love with painting much more deeply for having involved myself in this exhibition.  The photos don’t do the paint due justice.  The crown of the lion and the bells of the hyena’s jester hat are a rich metallic acrylic and catch the light oh-so-nicely.   There are metallic highlights in the hair of both predators and the eyes of the gazelle/antelope hybrid.  Creating the texture of the hair was maddening, challenging, and altogether worthwhile.  It’s not completely obvious in passing or at first glnce, but the gazelle has an open wound from which the vines are sprouting.   There are also a variety of style clashes happening:  The gazelle is painted in a slightly different style than the lion and hyena to emphasize that it is the prey animal.  The pseudo art nouveau quality of the paintings also seems strangely foreign given the African sitters’ origins. 
All in all I do say it was jolly good fun and I can’t wait to have another reason to paint. A friend of mine manages a gallery associated with the University of Texas.  We met for coffee one day to talk about an upcoming exhibition related to the run of The Lion King on campus.  At first, there were some specifics regarding the content of the artwork I was asked to produce for this exhibition, but those quickly fell to the wayside and was instead replaced with: “So long as it’s related to The Lion King in some way.” I was comforted by the looseness of these requirements, but also a bit disappointed with myself that, despite being given almost complete freedom,  I stuck to the script.
Alas, not entirely.   Although this triptych is definitely Lion King-y (reference: crown),  I definitely fell in love with painting much more deeply for having involved myself in this exhibition.  The photos don’t do the paint due justice.  The crown of the lion and the bells of the hyena’s jester hat are a rich metallic acrylic and catch the light oh-so-nicely.   There are metallic highlights in the hair of both predators and the eyes of the gazelle/antelope hybrid.  Creating the texture of the hair was maddening, challenging, and altogether worthwhile.  It’s not completely obvious in passing or at first glnce, but the gazelle has an open wound from which the vines are sprouting.   There are also a variety of style clashes happening:  The gazelle is painted in a slightly different style than the lion and hyena to emphasize that it is the prey animal.  The pseudo art nouveau quality of the paintings also seems strangely foreign given the African sitters’ origins. 
All in all I do say it was jolly good fun and I can’t wait to have another reason to paint. A friend of mine manages a gallery associated with the University of Texas.  We met for coffee one day to talk about an upcoming exhibition related to the run of The Lion King on campus.  At first, there were some specifics regarding the content of the artwork I was asked to produce for this exhibition, but those quickly fell to the wayside and was instead replaced with: “So long as it’s related to The Lion King in some way.” I was comforted by the looseness of these requirements, but also a bit disappointed with myself that, despite being given almost complete freedom,  I stuck to the script.
Alas, not entirely.   Although this triptych is definitely Lion King-y (reference: crown),  I definitely fell in love with painting much more deeply for having involved myself in this exhibition.  The photos don’t do the paint due justice.  The crown of the lion and the bells of the hyena’s jester hat are a rich metallic acrylic and catch the light oh-so-nicely.   There are metallic highlights in the hair of both predators and the eyes of the gazelle/antelope hybrid.  Creating the texture of the hair was maddening, challenging, and altogether worthwhile.  It’s not completely obvious in passing or at first glnce, but the gazelle has an open wound from which the vines are sprouting.   There are also a variety of style clashes happening:  The gazelle is painted in a slightly different style than the lion and hyena to emphasize that it is the prey animal.  The pseudo art nouveau quality of the paintings also seems strangely foreign given the African sitters’ origins. 
All in all I do say it was jolly good fun and I can’t wait to have another reason to paint. 

A friend of mine manages a gallery associated with the University of Texas.  We met for coffee one day to talk about an upcoming exhibition related to the run of The Lion King on campus.  At first, there were some specifics regarding the content of the artwork I was asked to produce for this exhibition, but those quickly fell to the wayside and was instead replaced with: “So long as it’s related to The Lion King in some way.” I was comforted by the looseness of these requirements, but also a bit disappointed with myself that, despite being given almost complete freedom,  I stuck to the script.

Alas, not entirely.   Although this triptych is definitely Lion King-y (reference: crown),  I definitely fell in love with painting much more deeply for having involved myself in this exhibition.  The photos don’t do the paint due justice.  The crown of the lion and the bells of the hyena’s jester hat are a rich metallic acrylic and catch the light oh-so-nicely.   There are metallic highlights in the hair of both predators and the eyes of the gazelle/antelope hybrid.  Creating the texture of the hair was maddening, challenging, and altogether worthwhile.  It’s not completely obvious in passing or at first glnce, but the gazelle has an open wound from which the vines are sprouting.   There are also a variety of style clashes happening:  The gazelle is painted in a slightly different style than the lion and hyena to emphasize that it is the prey animal.  The pseudo art nouveau quality of the paintings also seems strangely foreign given the African sitters’ origins. 

All in all I do say it was jolly good fun and I can’t wait to have another reason to paint. 


Oftentimes representations of cultures are boiled down to stereotypes.  Just take a look at a middle school history book. The only thing that most people can associate with my Swiss heritage/culture is Ricola, lederhosen, and hot chocolate.  In the transition between a first generation immigrant and their children’s children,  cultural icons are clung to tenaciously, allowed to fall to the wayside, and otherwise selectively (or not so selectively) passed down the generations. 
My mother married a Puerto Rican man long before I was born and he remained a part of my life for a very, very long time.  Through my association with him and many others I began to understand that leaving one’s own country required a certain leap of faith. Despite this faith, however, the grass on the other side of the border doesn’t always yield emeralds.  For most of my adult life I’ve worked with immigrants:  legal,  illegal, residents, etc., and have found myself fascinated particularly by Latin American immigrant culture.  Many of these immigrants leave their country in the hope of escaping poverty, extortion, dictatorships and so forth. They arrive in their new home only to face a new set of conflicts: Do they cling to the culture from which they came and risk becoming a walking stereotype,  do they fully assimilate and lose touch with their culture, will the opportunities they sought ever present themselves, is the life they came here for actually here?  View Larger

Oftentimes representations of cultures are boiled down to stereotypes.  Just take a look at a middle school history book. The only thing that most people can associate with my Swiss heritage/culture is Ricola, lederhosen, and hot chocolate.  In the transition between a first generation immigrant and their children’s children,  cultural icons are clung to tenaciously, allowed to fall to the wayside, and otherwise selectively (or not so selectively) passed down the generations. 

My mother married a Puerto Rican man long before I was born and he remained a part of my life for a very, very long time.  Through my association with him and many others I began to understand that leaving one’s own country required a certain leap of faith. Despite this faith, however, the grass on the other side of the border doesn’t always yield emeralds.  For most of my adult life I’ve worked with immigrants:  legal,  illegal, residents, etc., and have found myself fascinated particularly by Latin American immigrant culture.  Many of these immigrants leave their country in the hope of escaping poverty, extortion, dictatorships and so forth. They arrive in their new home only to face a new set of conflicts: Do they cling to the culture from which they came and risk becoming a walking stereotype,  do they fully assimilate and lose touch with their culture, will the opportunities they sought ever present themselves, is the life they came here for actually here? 


Brianna Marcus, Forward-To the Future, slab built high fire ceramic
I love this teapot.  Its aerodynamic fluidity lends itself well to its function.  The arch of water that comes out of this teapot matches its curve exactly.  The pot is constructed with pink slip which oozes out of its seams, reminiscent of happy, poppy bubble gum. View Larger

Brianna Marcus, Forward-To the Future, slab built high fire ceramic

I love this teapot.  Its aerodynamic fluidity lends itself well to its function.  The arch of water that comes out of this teapot matches its curve exactly.  The pot is constructed with pink slip which oozes out of its seams, reminiscent of happy, poppy bubble gum.


Brianna Marcus, Butters of the Udders: A Byzantine Icon, acrylic on canvas
A devotional painting of Butters Stotch, aka Professor Chaos.  I love capturing the spirit of pets and welcome commissions.

Brianna Marcus, Butters of the Udders: A Byzantine Icon, acrylic on canvas

A devotional painting of Butters Stotch, aka Professor Chaos.  I love capturing the spirit of pets and welcome commissions.


Brianna Marcus, Sin Titulo, acrylic on masonite
A painting I did for Mexic-Arte’s annual Mix ‘N’ Mash Exhibition.  The proceeds help fund education in the arts.  Good stuff.

Brianna Marcus, Sin Titulo, acrylic on masonite

A painting I did for Mexic-Arte’s annual Mix ‘N’ Mash Exhibition.  The proceeds help fund education in the arts.  Good stuff.